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Talent: You Have It! Share It!

Talent: You Have It!  Share It!

If you live the solitary life of a mountain man you will likely spend most of your time in the wilderness.   You’ll be surrounded by moose, elk, deer, bear and other animals found in places where few venture or witness.   You’ll  likely live by candlelight, or the soft light of a kerosene lantern, because you’ll have no electricity.   Your dinner will be dependent upon your talent and ability to provide it – hopefully with one shot from your rifle to conserve your ammunition.   Or perhaps you’ll catch a fish in a nearby river.   You’ll be so busy trying to survive – fixing things, preparing things, or inventing things – that you will not have time to record the experience.    Alone, you’ll not have a companion to share or witness the events of life, nor any progeny to pass along what you’ve learned to ease the burden of existence for the next generation.    You’re it.

One day, the indian tradition of the last walk will be fulfilled.   You’ll put on your best shoes and walk into the vast wilderness, never to be seen again.   You’ll disappear.  Nobody will even know that you lived a great life alone in the mountains, because you will not have shared anything of your life with anyone.    There will be no record of anything that you’ve done, witnessed, or learned.   Everything that you care about will be left to its own demise. 

[x_feature_headline type=”left” level=”h2″ looks_like=”h3″ icon=”book”]So, you ask, why should I share anything?[/x_feature_headline]

Can you read a book in the dark?    Unless you read Braille, the answer is no.  One must have light to discern the words on a page.  While writing might also be accomplished in the dark, a better result will be edited and rewritten, which requires light as well.   Even better, you should share your words with an editor who will detail your mistakes, ask questions, and focus your words to a point.   You’ll be forced to become a better writer.

The same can be said of any creative artistic endeavor.   Sharing what you create is essential for it to have meaning, purpose, and impact beyond your own enjoyment.  Sharing what you create will make you a better artist.   You will not suffer the regret of taking a solitary last walk, alone, into the abyss of obscurity.

[x_feature_headline type=”left” level=”h2″ looks_like=”h3″ icon=”crosshairs”]Art is anything created using talent in life not necessary for the sustainment of life.[/x_feature_headline]

Some tend to think of art in terms of modern psychology.   A psychologist might define art as a creative effort by a person that has some “Meaning” and “Expression” of the artist.   The psychological impression of art would include the drawings of a 3yr old toddler, but this doesn’t go far enough in my opinion.

Alternatively, some might think that art is a form of emotive communication of the emotions felt by the artist.  Such prudes think that anything created that doesn’t have an embedded emotion with intent to communicate in fact is not art.    Horse Hooey. 

Artistic talent is just that: talent.  When you combine the talent of an artist who has intuition, with the skill of imagination (which is also a talent), and the ability to discern reality – it’s my belief that you will benefit by sharing your talent.

[x_feature_headline type=”left” level=”h2″ looks_like=”h3″ icon=”share”]Share Your Talent[/x_feature_headline]

If you share your talent, you might inspire someone who is undergoing physical or emotional trauma to engage in a creative endeavor of their own.  By doing so, the practice of the creative effort will diminish their suffering.    You will have done something good.

You might also be surprised that one day a piece of your art is suddenly highlighted as the work of a gifted genius.  You’ll also be surprised to find out that it’s the piece of art that you yourself consider a piece of trash and not representative of your best effort.

An editor of the written word is a type of muse.  A muse is someone who causes a writer to focus on being a better writer, a painter to paint, etc.   The muse is someone who helps you engage or reengage in the creative process.  Sharing your talent allows you to create more, because you’ll be inspired to create more.

You should also share your creative talent because doing so will create more creative talent.   Said another way, a good bodybuilder lifts weights, but a great bodybuilder lifts heavy weights.   The end result of lifting bigger weights is more muscle mass, power and definition. 

find your talent and share it

You don’t lose your creative talents by sharing them, you amplify them.  Sharing your talent in an open manner allows you to explore new ideas, new concepts and to see and experience the world from a new perspective.  You’ll be able to see beauty where others might see only decay. 

Finally, you should share your talents because you don’t know who is watching what you post online.   You might find it surprising that a hollywood producer might take notice of your work.  Perhaps you’ll find that people are watching you who are willing to pay you for you to be you – simply by sharing your talents with others online.    

If you know someone who you think would benefit from sharing their talents, please share this post with them.  If this is you, it’s time to get busy, be creative, use your talent and share it with the world. 

I am 100% positive that we increase our talents when we share them. 

[x_feature_headline type=”center” level=”h4″ looks_like=”h2″ icon=”link”]Matthew 25: 14-30[/x_feature_headline]

  

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About The Author

Jeffrey W. Spencer

Jeff is a 25+ year survivor of stage IV melanoma cancer. He describes himself as an outdoorsman, though he is a technology professional and primarily works at a desk. He is a veteran of the USMC. His undergraduate studies were taken at SWTSU (Government/English), with graduate studies at Texas A&M (Philosophy), and the University of Texas at Austin School of Law. His hobbies include photography (landscape, travel), writing, and computers. He lives with his wife and some dogs in the Texas Hill Country.

3 Comments

  1. Jennifer Gifford

    This is so true! I have a hard time sharing my work because of fear that people will hate me. I have to remember to just do it and not to care what people think. Someone out there will love it.. I just have to share it




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  2. Katie

    I needed this! Sometimes I don’t want to share my work with the world. Inspiring message. 🙂




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  3. Kaleigh

    So inspiring!! It’s so important to share our talents. They are truly gifts.




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